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Using reflection and debriefs to enhance coaching: Wade Gilbert
July 21, 2017
“Why wait for a disaster to have a really open and frank conversation?” Wade Gilbert asked this at the GAIN conference in his presentation on reflection and debriefs for coaches. (This was two days after the Grenfell tower disaster where many people were asking the same thing). Wade said that systematic reflection could be the […]
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Speed Training for Gymnasts

speed training for gymnastsHow to get to the Vault or Double Mini Trampoline quicker

.In order to generate a bigger jump, gymnasts need a faster approach to the Vault or Double Mini Trampoline (DMT). This involves them running for about 20-30m and then jumping onto a springboard or the DMT.

Speed training for gymnasts starts with posture (again)..

speed for gymnasts

Strong hips help speed

Regular readers and athletes I work with will know that I start off with posture. It is hard to run fast if you are sagging like a jellyfish before you start.

Whilst gymnasts are very strong at what they do, their lifestyle is affecting their standing and running posture.

We have to put certain exercises and training in first to allow their bodies to get strong and support the speed. This is developing their structural integrity.

Coach the cause rather than the symptom

I made a mistake when first working with the Wellington Whirlwinds on trying to fix the very strange arm actions that the trampolinists had when running. I worked hard at getting them to use an “elbow high and back” arm action to be more efficient.

However, Gary Winckler had previously spoken to me about the upper body being an indicator of what was going on below. When I saw Gary at GAIN  a few years ago, I said I had some sucess and he said the weird arm action was due to gymnasts being excessive plantor flexors which leads to straight leg running action, which then leads to straight arms.

DOH! Blindingly obvious when I thought about it. I had been working on the overall sprint mechanics but had been distracted by the arms.

We did a specific speed session out on the track with the group which was a break through moment. We established some common drills and common language which made it easier to go back into the gym and coach on the runway.

This included:

to help the run action. Speed for gymnasts needs to be constantly refined and the warm ups are a good place to reinforce these correct mechanics at every opportunity.

Shorten the run up

speed training for gymnasts

Shorten the run up

When working with the youngsters at Gemini, I asked them why they started their run up where they did: they were just guessing.

When I watched them approach the vault, there was a lot of pitter pattering as they got near and they were slowing down. This meant a loss of speed.

I got them to start near the springboard, then go back two metres at a time to see how they could maintain their speed. When they started the pitter patter, they went forward again two metres. That was their new start position.

I got the youngsters to self assess where they should start, rather than Carolyn and I dictate. This became an “honesty competition” and we were delighted that they became very accurate on their self assessment.

There is little point starting a run up from 30 metres away, then having to slow down as you approach take off. Instead, start short, get used to the take off and gradually increase the distance as you run faster and you can control that speed. Speed for gymnasts is different from top speed running because of the short  distance.

When I coached at Exe Valley Gymnastics I helped this this young gymnast who is very fast. She has a short run up (due to hall constraints) but really attacks the vault   

Her foot strike is excellent, as is her hip position of the stance leg. However, she does use her arms too early, looking more like a long jumper here.

Here is me doing a less technically good  and slower vault, but using the arms correctly: 

Summary

Speed training for gymnasts is a work in progress because as the gymnasts develop their technical skills and perform more complex routines, they need more approach speed.

As they develop more approach speed, they need to be able to convert that speed into vertical/ horizontal jumping ability.

Underpinning all of this is strength/ posture to allow them to move efficiently and be robust enough to withstand the rigours of training.

Thanks to Carolyn and Bernie and everyone at the clubs for their input and efforts.

I am currently implementing these ideas in Willand and Wellington with the young gymnasts I work with at our gymnastics club.

Comments

  1. […] forward to next time. I have since worked with 2 clubs on their specifc speed training for gymnasts on the vault and double mini […]

  2. […] How to get gymnasts stronger, a reflective piece on how strength training has been applied. Speed training for gymnasts: a look at common running errors for the vault and DMT and how to get your gymnasts running […]

  3. […] Trampolining: Wellington Whirlwinds “Speed training for gymnasts“ […]

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David Ardley- triathlete
I had the pleasure (I think !) of working with James for a year or so focused on getting my Triathlon times down. Its amazing what was achieved in the space of an hour before work. What stood out for me is the constant variation of exercises and his ability to set the difficulties levels just right. His sense of humour and competitive spirit always helped when my energy levels were not quite there. I can attribute his structured training to my eventual success competing in the World Triathlon championships (age group) in Hamburg.
 
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Level 1 Strength and Conditioning Course – Kensington, London. 19-20 August 2017. Venue: Westway Sport & Fitness Centre, 1 Crowthorne Rd, London W10 6RP Asessment Day – Sunday 1 October 2017. Cost: £280 including materials and access to online resources. To book send a deposit of £100 here. The deposit is non refundable.  Once the full balance has been paid and […]

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