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How to prevent over training in teenagers
February 20, 2019
How to prevent overtraining in young athletesOvertraining is common in young athletes due to the high demand put on them by schools and sports teams. Schools will get talented young athletes to compete in as many sports as possible and these same athletes will also train outside of school for a team they play for in one or more sports.An example week in the life of a young athlete –Monday – P.E., School netball trainingTuesday – School hockey training, Team netball training
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Speed Training: co-ordination versus strength.

Adjusting the dials for your athlete

When looking at a new athlete and their running, I try to assess whether we can improve speed through co-ordination training or strength training, or both.

I use the analogy of having two dials with the athletes: they both are necessary, but we adjust one at a time according to the athlete’s needs.

“Strength” coaches will always look at squats first with “maximal strength” being the answer to everything. However, it could be a relative strength issue, for example when trying to improve the speed of rugby players there is a trade off between size and function.

speed training for rugby propsStudies at the Brisbane Broncos showed momentum to be a key feature of high performing players. Momentum is mass x velocity; if you increase your mass without concomitant improvement in relative strength (your ability to control your own body weight in all planes of movement) there is likely to be a reduction in velocity i.e. your momentum may go down.

Mindless hypertrophy work or two legged sagital plane work may indeed increase mass and strength in that plane, but you must be able to apply it on the field. 

Most rugby players I see tend to work on mass at the expense of co-ordination: the “Get slower” programme.

I work hard on their co-ordination in running and change of direction drills. Props are very hard to tackle once they have learnt to run fast.

What about young athletes and females?

Posture for sprints

I am lucky to work with some fast young athletes from different sports at the ADC in Devon. None of them have great “maximal strength” but they do have high levels of muscular coordination.

In these athletes, and also with most females, strength training is required to allow them to withstand the rigours of training and playing. This starts with control of their own body weight, then progresses to challenging this in different planes, different directions, different speeds.

Then we increase volume, then we may add external load when ready.

Some athletes are naturally strength athletes, some are naturally speed (co-ordination) athletes. Both types of training are necessary, but adjust the dial according to their needs.

One size fits all” is a shortcut that rarely leads to success.

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Comments

  1. […] Slow: If you don’t work on the application of strength through a full range of motion, and at speed, then you might end up getting slower as they found in Australia. […]

  2. […] Strength – how much work can the muscles do? […]

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Client Testimonials

Rugby Football League
James' knowledge of strength and conditioning has been a valuable resource that I have used to enhance the training programmes at 4 professional Rugby League clubs; Harlequins, St Helens, Whitehaven and Workington. He has had a positive impact on the performance of the athletes and added to the professional development of coaching staff
 
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Athletic Development Coach – NORTH DEVON – COMING SOON
01 Apr 2019

Athletic Development Coach – NORTH DEVON

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