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Fitness training for Field Hockey: Part 2
May 24, 2017
When looking to improve speed and agility we first need to look at what areas contribute towards them. Other than technique which is essential we can also work on:force production movement efficiency decision making
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Injury Prevention in the gym: Roy Headey

Do any of the following rugby-related comments sound familiar?

  • “There’s a gym culture in rugby that produces ‘gym monkeys’ and that’s what’s spoiling the game”
  • “Nowadays, players spend too much time in the gym and not enough time practicing skills”
  • “They’re supposed to be rugby players, not weight-lifters” 
  • “Weight training is dangerous for young players”

All of these are gross oversimplifications and in the last case, plain wrong.

Elite players certainly spend more time in the gym now than they did in the past.  But their training is more than simply about getting “bigger” (hypertrophy).  An over-emphasis on size alone can result in players who are bigger, but often fatter and slower too; they’re not much use for a dynamic game like rugby.

It’s also true that a bigger guy moving fast will exert more force in a collision than a smaller one moving at the same speed, but better conditioning and specific strength training can help players of all shapes and sizes to protect themselves against injuries.

rugby injury preventionA lot of work players do in the gym nowadays is actually improving their resistance to injury, so spending time in the gym doing the right things can have a beneficial effect.

That being said, things can go wrong in the gym if players aren’t following well-designed programmes.

Generating a muscle imbalance through poor training is a one example.  Muscles work in a complimentary fashion around joints; if there’s an imbalance in the way those muscles interact, one or more of the major muscles can exert extreme forces on a joint that is less able to protect itself.

For example, if a player does a lot of bench press work but not enough complimentary pulling and shoulder stability training, he can create instability in the shoulders that dramatically increases his predisposition to shoulder injuries.

So that’s definitely the sort of gym culture and gym monkey we don’t want to encourage.  Information is also available about strength and conditioning coaching certificates, designed to provide accessible, practical training for sports coaches in the specifics of fitness development.

Roy Headey: RFU Head of Sports Science

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Jenny McGeever
James has been my strength and conditioning coach since June 2009 and during this time he has provided me with constant support and helped me develop as an athlete, from Under 17 international level to senior international. He is currently helping me with my transition from fencer to Modern Pentathlete.
 
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Athletic Development CPD workshop
25 Jun 2017

Athletic Development CPD workshop Exclusive CPD opportunity for sports coaches, physiotherapists and p.e. teachers who have attended one of our previous courses. Following feedback from attendees of our recent courses, we have designed this workshop to help you implement practices the next day at your club or school. The workshop will be mostly practical with an […]

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