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Football training programme for under-18 player

Needs Analysis of under- 18 football player

football training programmeA guest post by Simon Worsnop, this study provides  a needs analysis and periodised football training programme for an 18 year old male academy fullback, based on the requirements of football and the individual.

It accounts for his test scores and medical history. Although he has had no chronic injuries to date, he exhibits knee valgus on rapid knee and hip flexion.

Table 1. Performance results of the case study athlete and normative data.

TestCase Study PlayerNormative Data
Height1.79m179.3 Boone et al 2012

177.2 Sporis et al 2009

Body Mass79kg73.4 Boone et al., 2012

74.5 Sporis et al 2009

Body Fat %8.910.8 Rebelo et al., 2012

10.4 Boone et al., 2012

12.2 Sporis et al 2009

VO2max test (Direct Gas Analysis on Treadmill) ml.kg.min-16859.2
Sporis et al 2009,61.2 Vasilios and Kalapotharak 2011,61.2 Boone et al., 2012
5-Repetition Maximum Squat kg82.5142.47 Comfort et al., 2014

149.3 Styles et al 2016

Countermovement Jump35cm46.35 Comfort et al 2014,

38.6 Boone et al., 2012,

44.2 Sporis et al 2009,

40.2 Castagna et al 2013,

39.2 Arnason et al 2004,

37.0 Ingerbrightson et al 2013

5m Sprint Time s1.161.0 Comfort et al 2014

1.05 Styles et al 2016

1.43 Sporis et al 2009

10m Sprint Time s2.131.78 Styles et al 2016

1.93 Mendez-Villanueva et al., 2011

2.14 Sporis et al 2009

20m Sprint Time s3.303.00 Comfort et al 2014

3.05 Styles et al 2016

3.22 Manuel-Lopez et al., 2011

3.36 Sporis et al 2009

Notes: Boone et al 2012 data on Elite Belgian Midfielders

Sporis et al 2009 data on Croatian 1st Division Mid Field Players

Castagna et al 2013 U20 Italian national players

Ingerbrightson et al 2013 Elite Danish 17 year old players

Comfort et al 2014 17 year old English Academy players Squat Score is 1RM based on 5RM test

Styles et al 2016 18 year old British Academy players 1RM 90o Knee Angle Squat.

 

The player is a fullback. He has two years’ strength and conditioning experience; training twice a week on a physical literacy programme. He is competent in the basic lifts including the front, back and overhead squats. He trains with a sub-elite league academy thrice weekly.

Table 2: Training Schedule

18.00 – 18.4518.50 – 20.0020.00 – 20.30
MondayWeightsTechnical/TacticalSmall Sided Games
WednesdayWeightsTechnical/TacticalSmall Sided Games
FridaySpeed & PlyometricsTechnical/TacticalSmall Sided Games
SaturdayIn Season: Match on most Saturday afternoons

Introduction

football training programmeFootball is a high intensity aerobic game game, with a player’s metabolic conditioning being crucial to his performance (Helgerud et al 2001). A Premier League full back covers 10,730m in a game; 1,115m of this above 19km/h (defined as high intensity distance) and 288m above 26.2km/h (defined as sprint distance), comprising a total of 68 sprints (Walker and Hawkins 2018).

Players sprint every 90 seconds for a distance of between 1.5 m and 100m, with over 90% of these being less than 30 m (Bangsbo 1992), and almost half the sprints less than 10 m (Mirkov et al 2005). Because some of the sprints are from a rolling start or cover distances of over 60m maximum speed is important. Sprints can often decide the outcome of a game, determining who gets to the ball first (Comfort et al 2014). A player changes direction every 2 to 4 seconds,  a total of over 1200 within a game (Bangsbo 1992, Verheijen 1997)
. Therefore, metabolic training should emphasise the repeatability of these high intense activities as opposed to long continuous running.

European soccer players miss on average 37/300 days through injury (Ehrmann et al 2016). Most injuries occurred in the lower extremities (82.9%), with the most common diagnosis being muscle/tendon injury (32.9%), especially hamstrings (13.3%) and groin (8.3%) (Stubbe et al 2015). One injury that can be career threatening is an Anterior Cruciate Ligament rupture. Whilst these are high profile injuries, their occurrence is relatively low (0.43 per team per season) (Walden et al 2016). From both a player welfare perspective, and in order to be able to select the best team any training programme should aim to reduce injury occurrence.

Player Needs Analysis

His anthropometric measurements are within the norms of elite soccer players (Carling et al 2010), body mass being towards the top of the range. Compared with data in the table the player has a very good endurance level measured by his VO2max test. VO2max testing is done via a number of methods, which makes comparisons not ideal. Tests such as MSFT and YoYoIET have an acceleration and deceleration element which a treadmill test does not, possibly explaining the high score in this test. It is important not to get to “hung up” on VO2max scores as they do not always correlate with game related fatigue (Hoffman et al 1999). 

In comparison with normative data exhibited in Table 1 the player is deficient in speed, strength and power. His squat strength is well below that expected for a player of his status, and improving this must be the priority as this will have a positive effect on speed and power (Comfort et al 2014). Currently his 5 Repetition Maximum (5RM) is 82.5kg which approximates to a 1RM of 92.75kg using the Brzycki Formula. This compares to scores of over 140kg in similar players in the works of Comfort et al., 2014, and Styles et al 2016. Squatting results are sometimes difficult to compare, some being based upon 5RM and others on 1RM, and differences of depth in various data, however even taking all this into account the difference in squat performance is huge. 

football speed testCounter Movement Jump (CMJ) is a validated measure of power (Comfort et al 2014). The player’s CMJ scores are below those observed in similar aged players; 10cm below English 17 year olds (Comfort et al 2014), 5cm below Italian U20 (Castagna et al 2013) players and 2cm lower than Danish U17 players (Ingerbrightson et al 2013). These scores indicate a deficiency in power.

The same can be said for his speed scores with his 5, 10 and 20 metre times all being considerably slower than similar scores. The speed tests from some European studies e.g., Sporis (2009) seem at odds with other results, this may be due to the reliability of the timing systems, starting procedures or running surface, therefore I have only considered those conducted most recently by British authors i.e., Comfort et al 2014 and Styles et al 2016.

An area of concern is the valgus movement of the knee during hip and knee flexion, which may significantly increase strain on the anterior cruciate ligament (Berns et al., 1992). This condition is often associated with weakness in the hip area, specifically the Gluteus medius (Hollman et al 2009). This will be addressed in the programme, although “knee valgus means nothing if you don’t identify the cause” (Cook 2003 p 193). Proprioceptive/coordination training has been shown to reduce ankle injuries and better jumping and landing mechanics have been shown to decrease the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes (Junge and Dvorak  2004), and these should form part of the warm up for field sessions. As stated earlier, there is a prevalence of groin and hamstring injuries within football and therefore exercises such as Nordics and Single Leg Stiff Leg Deadlifts are included in the strength programme with hip mobility and lateral lunges being part of the field warm up (not discussed in this article).

Periodised Footballl Training Programme 

Metabolic Training

Players with improved aerobic fitness covered greater distances, increased work intensity, the number of sprints and were involved in more “decisive” plays (Coutts 2005). Running velocity at Lactate Threshold is a key feature of football fitness (Ziogas 2011), therefore speed and anaerobic fitness are important.  Fatigue may also lead to reduced skill accuracy and decision-making ability (Stone et al 2009), and therefore influence game outcome.

Players spend two thirds training at low intensities; however, only the time spent at high intensity (>90%max HR) improves aerobic fitness (Castagna et al 2011). High-intensity interval training successfully improves aerobic fitness in a relatively short period of time and is an efficient training mode. Eight weeks of interval training increased VO2 max by 10.8 per cent, running velocity at lactate threshold by 13.1 per cent and increased running efficiency by 6.7 per cent (Helgerud et al 2001). Hoff and Helgerud 2004) used an intensity of 90 – 95 per cent of maximum heart rate (HRmax) for a duration of three to eight minutes, with recovery periods of 3 minutes at approximately 60-70 per cent HRmax.

Small Sided Games (SSG) have beneficial results in football (Helgerud et al 2007); academy footballers using SSG improved performance equally to those following an aerobic interval training protocol (Reilly and White 2004), this protocol thus being an adequate substitute for physical training (Little and Williams 2006). Not all players achieve the same training results from SSG (Baker 2014). Players should be wearing Heart Rate Monitors and/or GPS to monitor the sessions. To provide bespoke metabolic training Maximal Aerobic Speed sessions could be implemented (Baker 2011).

Owen et al (2012) found a 4-week period of SSG did improve Repeat Sprint Ability (RSA) and Running Efficiency; however, Gabbett and Mulvey (2008) found SSG may not simulate high-intensity, repeated-sprint demands. (The Owen study has some serious design faults, and extrapolating the conclusions is questionable). RSA is often trained separately through position specific pattern runs that include a high-level skill component (Walker and Hawkins 2018), as it may be poorly associated with Intermittent high-intensity endurance (Turner and Stewart 2014).

Many successful coaches integrate SSGs within a holistic tactical approach known as “tactical periodization” (Delgado-Bordonau, and Mendez-Villaneuva, 2012). If SSG are being used as the sole method of improving metabolic condition they should be periodized appropriately.  Footballers must reach their peak in pre-season and maintain it through a long season (Turner and Stewart 2014). Therefore, the annual plan must reflect this.

Player numbers, pitch size and the presence of a goal keeper affect physiological outcomes. Larger dimensions increase the aerobic demands (Casamichana and Castellano 2010, Rampinini et al 2007) but reduce the pressure of decision making; reducing field size increases decelerations, accelerations, direction changes and contacts with other players, and should not be introduced in phase 1 (Burgess 2014).

Thirty minutes training time is allocated to small sided games. Longer periods of work and larger player numbers are used early in the preseason. Players work more intensely in shorter interval periods; therefore, the rest periods are normally of approximately equivalent time. In larger sided games played for a longer time period the rest period is relatively lower. When reducing rest periods it is important to monitor that players are able to maintain the required intensity. Low intensity skill drills are used in the longer recovery periods (> 1 minute).

Friday’s session occurs when there is no game, therefore whilst the purpose is primarily metabolic conditioning, larger numbers (5 a side) are used to increase the tactical component and the numbers of high velocity actions. Wednesday’s session is in addition to a match on a Saturday, therefore the numbers are smaller to increase the metabolic intensity, with less requirement for tactical stimulation (Turner and Stewart 2014). This is similar to the “intensive” and “extensive” approach (Walker and Hawkins 2018). Constraints in SSGs are adapted to achieve physical and tactical outcomes (Worsnop 2011); however here, for simplicity, equal numbers are used and it would be up to the coach on the day to manipulate these as required.

Speed and plyometric training are emphasised in Friday’s programme (not analysed in this article); so during the second phase, compared with Monday, SSGs with the smaller area will be used.

Table 3. Summary of Metabolic Periodisation.

PhasePlayer NumbersPitch SizeInterval Periods
1Initially 7 v 7, including a goalkeeper reducing to 5 v 5 without a goalkeeper40 x 30 increasing to 60 x 40The larger sided games will be played for periods of between 4 & 8 minutes. The work time of the smaller sided games will progressively reduce as will the size of the pitch. This should shift the emphasis from aerobic conditioning with some longer sprints to anaerobic with more acceleration, turning and deceleration.
23 v 3 on Friday

3 v 3 to 5 v 5 on Wednesday

15 v 15 to 20 x 25

25 x 30 to 60 x 40

3Various dependent upon the available players, injury and fatigue status etc.  A variety will be played within the week and in consecutive weeks rather than specific blocks. This form of concurrent periodization is more applicable to team sports and practically also avoids a player missing a whole stimulus  block
4
5

Strength Training Programme

In the Pre-season strength training will follow a classical periodization programme, but in the competition phase an undulating approach (Poliquin, 1988).is used with volumes and intensities manipulated on a weekly and daily basis depending upon the playing schedule and the individual’s fatigue status (Turner and Stewart 2014).

Whilst there will be a greater emphasis on one strength quality within each mesocycle, there should always be some aspect of the others, especially the speed aspect that is so vital for success in football.  Olympic Lifts are used to generate power (Hoffmann et al 2004). The player is competent in various squats, however there is no mention of Olympic Lifts. Therefore, these have not been included, but simple dumbbell and barbell derivatives have been.

Squats are emphasized, as there are strong correlations with both absolute and relative squat strength and sprint and jumping performance in trained youth and adult soccer players (Comfort et al 2014). A twice weekly 6 week in-season programme with one higher (4 x 5/85-90%) and one lower (3 x 3/85-90%) volume session showed moderate increases in absolute and relative strength and small but significant improvements in sprint time (Styles 2016). Some practitioners do not use back squats (Bosch 2015, Boyle 2010), but they are in a minority, ¾ of rugby conditioners regarding it as the most important exercise (Jones et al 2017), Some exercises are more suitable than others in developing power than maximum strength. Various weighted and unweighted jumps are extremely useful in developing power.

Table 4: Programme Summary

Phase 1Phase 2Phase 3Phase 4Phase 5
Strength EnduranceStrengthStrengthPowerPower
Day 1
ExplosiveClean High Pull From FloorClean Pull to ThighSingle Arm Dumb Bell SnatchMid-Thigh Rack PullJump Shrug
Squat TypeFront SquatFront SquatBack SquatConcentric Box JumpBack Squat + Drop Jump
Horizontal PressDumb Bell Incline Press

+ Dumb Bell Split Squat

Incline PressBench PressSmith Machine Bench ThrowsVRT Bench Press
Vertical PullPull Ups

+ Dumb Bell Lateral Lunge

Chin UpsWide Grip Pull UpsMedicine Ball SlamsChin Ups
Hip BentDumb Bell Walking Lunge
Rotational +/or RehabDumb Bell Step Up +

Cable Wood Chop

Nordic Raise
Day 2
ExplosiveSnatch Pull From FloorSnatch Pull From ThighBarbell CMJSingle Arm Dumb Bell Snatch
SL SquatDumb Bell Lunge + CMJBarbell LungeBack Squat
Vertical PressSeated Dumb Bell Press + SB Leg CurlStanding Dumb Bell PressMilitary PressDumbbell Push PressDumbbell Push Jerk
Horizontal PullStanding Cable RowBent Over RowSeated Cable RowProne RowSA Standing Cable Row
Hip StraightKB SL SLDLBB SL SLDLTRX Leg CurlNordic RaiseKB SL SLDL
Rotational or RehabNordic Raise

Rotational and Rehabilitation exercises will be added as the coach sees fit dependent upon the player’s status.

Phase 1 (Weeks 1 to 3)

training programme for football

banded hip raises

Classically this is known as the hypertrophy phase, but more specifically it is strength endurance.  Volume increases in preparation for what follows, using high repetition ranges, lower intensities and supersets. The primary aim is to increase tolerance to the demands being placed on the body and to address individual concerns via bespoke exercises. The number of exercises is greater than in subsequent phases, and includes more unilateral exercises and different planes.

Specific to this player, split squats and step ups will be included to work the gluteus muscles in a sport specific way (Boyle 2010, Contreras 2009), and exercises for glute activation, e.g. mini-band walks and banded clams should be included during warm ups (Walker and Hawkins 2018)

The programme must include horizontal and vertical push and pull exercises alongside adequate trunk training. There are a number of approaches to twice a week training, the one used offers a balanced approach, where the various exercise groups are spread over the two days. Where possible exercises within a preceding phase act as a preparation for the next.

Table 5 Phase 1 Strength Endurance Week (1 to 3)

Monday

18.30 – 19.15

Clean High Pull From FloorFront SquatDumbbell Incline Press

+ Dumbbell Split Squat

Pull Ups

+ Dumbbell Lateral Lunge

Dumbbell Step Up +

Cable Wood Chop

Week 13 x 12

40% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 12

60% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 12

45s between sets

3 x 12

45s between sets

3 x 12 each leg

45s between sets

Week 23 x 12

50% 1RM 60s between sets

4 x 12

60% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 12 – 15

45s between sets

3 x 12 -15

45s between sets

3 x 12- 15 each leg

45s between sets

Week 33 x 12

60% 1RM 60s between sets

4 x 12

70% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 12 – 15

45s between sets

3 x 12 -15

45s between sets

3 x 12- 15 each leg

45s between sets

NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more but in this phase you should have a “repetition to spare” working in good form not to failure. For the other exercises choose weights that will allow you to work within the given rep’ range. Where there are two exercises these are carried with the second immediately following the first. Use assistance bands with the pull ups if required

Front squats are used as they use less load than back squats. A clean high pull uses less load than a pull to the thigh, and is appropriate to this phase.  Super setting allows volume to be added in various lower limb exercises to improve specific strength endurance.

Table 6 Phase 1 Strength Endurance (Week 1 to 3)

Wednesday

18.30 – 19.15

Snatch Pull From FloorDumb Bell Lunge + CMJSeated Dumb Bell Press + Swiss Ball Leg CurlStanding Cable RowKettlebell Single Leg Stiff Legged DeadiftNordic Raise
Week 13 x 12

40% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 12 el +10

45s between sets

3 x 12 +12

45s between sets

3 x 12

45s between sets

3 x 12 each leg

45s between sets

3 x 8
Week 23 x 12

50% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 15 el+ 10

45s between sets

3 x 12 – 15 +12

45s between sets

3 x 12 -15

45s between sets

3 x 12- 15 each leg

45s between sets

3 x 12
Week 33 x 12

60% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 15 el + 10

45s between sets

3 x 12 – 15 + 12

45s between sets

3 x 12 -15

45s between sets

3 x 12- 15 each leg

45s between sets

3 x 15
NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more but in this phase you should have a “repetition to spare” working in good form not to failure. For the other exercises choose weights that will allow you to work within the given rep’ range. Where there are two exercises these are carried with the second immediately following the first. Use assistance bands with the pull ups if required  For the Nordic Curls attach your feet under the feet hooks of a cable machine, use a band around your chest attached to the column so that you main control throughout the descent (Refer to the video on the Academy Facebook Page)

Specific details for Nordic curls are included as they are often poorly executed.

Table 7 Phase 2 Strength (Week 4 -6)

Monday

18.30 – 19.15

Clean Pull to ThighFront SquatIncline PressChin UpsNordic Raise
Week 43 x 5

75% -85% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 8

80% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 8

80% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 8
Week 53 x 4

80 -90% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6

85% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6

85% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 12
Week 63 x 3

85-95% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 15
NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more Make sure you have carried out any prehab before starting your programme and are fully warmed up and mobilized.  Use 2 -3 warm up sets prior to your work sets for the clean pulls and squats. Use weighted vests or belts for the chin ups. For the Nordic use a lighter resistance band than in phase 1.

Clean pulls develop “strength speed”. The rest period, less than that used by competitive lifters is more appropriate for footballers.

Table 8 Phase 2 Strength (Week 4 -6)

Wednesday

18.30 – 19.15

Snatch Pull From ThighBarbell LungeStanding Dumb Bell PressBent Over RowBB Single Leg Stiff Leg DeadLift
Week 43 x 5

75% -80% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6 each leg

90s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 6
Week 53 x 4

80-85%1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6 each leg

90s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 6
Week 63 x 3

85-95% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4 each leg

90s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 6
NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more. Make sure you have carried out any prehab before starting your programme and are fully warmed up and mobilized.  Use 2 -3 warm up sets prior to your work sets for the snatch pulls and lunges. If you have any back soreness/fatigue substitute supported bent over dumbbell rows for barbell row

The snatch pull from thigh is used on the second day as it uses less weight. Lifts from the hang have a greater speed component than those from the floor.

Table 9 Phase 3 Strength (Weeks 7 – 12)

Monday

18.30 – 19.15

Single Arm Dumb Bell SnatchBack SquatBench PressWide Grip Pull Ups
Weeks 7 – 83 x 5

60s between sets

3 x 5

85% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 8

80% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

Weeks 9 – 103 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6

85% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

Week 11-123 x 3

60s between sets

3 x 3

92%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more Make sure you have carried out any prehab before starting your programme and are fully warmed up and mobilized.  Use 2 -3 warm up sets prior to your work sets for the squats. Use weighted vests or belts for the pull ups.

Back squats use more weight than front squats providing greater neurological stimulation. Due to the extra stresses placed on the body by the back squat, single arm dumbbell snatches are used as a power exercise as opposed to an Olympic barbell derivative.

Table 10 Phase 3 Strength (Weeks 7 – 12)

Wednesday

18.30 – 19.15

Back SquatMilitary PressSeated Cable RowTRX Leg Curl
Weeks 7 – 83 x 3

80% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 5

85% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 8

80% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

Weeks 9 – 103 x 3

82%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 6

85% 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

Weeks 11- 123 x 3

85% 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 3

92%+ 1RM 90s between sets

3 x 4

90%+ 1RM 60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, if you are feeling stronger you may be able to add slightly more Make sure you have carried out any prehab before starting your programme and are fully warmed up and mobilized.  Use 2 -3 warm up sets prior to your work sets for the squats and military press. Maintain bridge position in TRX leg curl (check video on Academy Facebook page)

TRX curls are used as opposed to a traditional exercise such as the RDL to reduce load on the back.

Table 11 Phase 4 Power (Week 13 – 18)

Monday

18.30 – 19.15

Mid-Thigh Rack PullConcentric Box JumpSmith Machine Bench ThrowsMedicine Ball Slams
Week 13 – 143 x 5 70% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 5

90s between sets

3 x 8 20% 1RM 60s between sets3 x 5 (use 10% of body weight)

60s between sets

Week 15- 163 x 4 75% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 4

90s between sets

3 x 6 25% 1RM 60s between sets3 x 6

60s between sets

Week 17- 183 x 3 80% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 3

90s between sets

3 x 4 30% 1RM 60s between sets3 x 4

60s between sets

NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, do not be tempted to add extra weight to the bench throw as we aiming for speed of movement as well as speed of muscle contraction. For the box jumps aim to increase the height of the box each week.

This session concentrates almost exclusively on power, with the rack pull also offering some strength stimulus. Bench throws load should be low in an inexperienced athlete (Baker 2001), velocity measurement would be useful.

Table 12  Phase 4 Power (Week 13 – 18)

Wednesday

18.30 – 19.15

Barbell CMJDumbbell Push PressProne RowNordic Raise
Week 13 – 143 x 5 25% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 5

90s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 8
Week 15- 163 x 4 30% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 4

90s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 12
Week 17- 183 x 3 35% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 3

90s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 15
NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, do not be tempted to add extra weight to the CMJ as we aiming for speed of movement as well as speed of muscle contraction. For the Nordic Raise choose an appropriate resistance band if required.

Dumbbell Push Presses and supported rows are used in case of residual fatigue from the long season. CMJ load should be low in an inexperienced athlete (Baker 2001), velocity measurement would be useful.

Table 13  Phase 5 Power (Week 19 – 24)

Monday

18.30 – 19.15

Jump ShrugBack Squat + Drop JumpVRT Bench PressChin Ups
Week 19 – 203 x 5 30% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 5 (75%) + 5

60s between squat and jump and subsequent squat

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

 

Week 21- 223 x 4 35% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 4 (80%) + 5

60s between squat and jump and subsequent squat

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

Week 23- 243 x 3 40% 1RM

60s between sets

3 x 3 (85%) + 5

60s between squat and jump and subsequent squat

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

NotesOn major exercises work to the percentages 1RM given, do not be tempted to add extra weight as we aiming for speed of movement as well as speed of muscle contraction. For the drop jumps aim to increase the height of the box each week (you will be given the exact depths to work from). Use 20% load from elastic bands for VRT Bench Press
best football training programme

Jump training

Back squats are re-introduced, otherwise the player would not squat for over 12 weeks. The load is a compromise between providing enough stimulus and not inducing fatigue. Jump Shrugs are used as the power exercise, with the emphasis on the speed part of the speed-strength curve. Variable Resistance Training is included as it improves speed strength in academy age athletes (Rivie`re.2017).

Table 14  Phase 5 Power (Week 19 – 24)

Wednesday

18.30 – 19.15

Single Arm Dumb Bell SnatchDumbbell Push JerkSingle Arm Standing Cable RowKettlebell Single Leg Stiff Leg DeadLift
Week 19 – 203 x 5

60s between sets

3 x 5

60s between sets

 

3 x 8

60s between sets

3 x 8

60s between sets

 

Week 21- 223 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

 

3 x 6

60s between sets

3 x 6

60s between sets

Week 23- 243 x 3

60s between sets

3 x 3

60s between sets

 

3 x 4

60s between sets

3 x 4

60s between sets

NotesMake sure you work on scapula retraction during the cable row.

Single limb exercises are used on “day 2”, to reduce the risk of fatigue when using a heavier barbell alternative, and emphasising the speed element of power.

Metabolic Conditioning

Table 15  Phase 1 (Week 1 – 3)

WednesdayFriday
Week 17 v 7 including goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

3 x 8 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

6 v 6 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 x 6 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 26 v 6 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 x 6 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 5 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 36 v 6 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 x 6 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 6 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Table 16  Phase 2 (Week 4 – 6)

WednesdayFriday
Week 45 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

3 v 3 no goalkeeper

Pitch Size 25 x 20

4 v 4 minutes

4 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 54 v 4 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

3 v 3 no goalkeeper

Pitch Size 20 x 15

5 v 3 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 63 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery between sets 1 & 2 and 2 & 3, 2 minutes light skills between sets 3 & 4 (Do not tell players about the reduced rest period, note how they react mentally and physically)

3 v 3 no goalkeeper

Pitch Size 15 x 15

6 v 2.5 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Table 17  Phase 3 (Week 7 – 12)

 

WednesdayFriday
Week 75 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 83 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

6 x 2.5 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 94 v 4 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 103 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

(2 x (4 x 2) minutes)

1 minute recovery between reps 2 minutes between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 115 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

5 v 4 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 123 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

2 x (4 x 2) minutes)

1 minute recovery between reps 2 minutes between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Table 18  Phase 4 (Week 13 – 18)

WednesdayFriday
Week 135 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 143 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

6 x 2 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 154 v 4 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 163 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

6 x 2 minutes

1.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 175 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 x 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 183 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

8 x 2 minutes

1.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Table 19  Phase 5 (Week 19 – 24)

WednesdayFriday
Week 195 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 203 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

6 v 2.5 minutes

2 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 214 v 4 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 223 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

(2 x (4 x 2) minutes)

1 minute recovery between reps 2 minutes between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 235 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

5 v 4 minutes

2.5 minutes light skills drills as recovery

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 50 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Week 243 v 3 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 40 x 30

2 x (4 x 2) minutes 1 minute recovery between reps 2 minutes between sets

5 v 5 no goalkeeper.

Pitch Size 60 x 40

4 v 4 minutes

3 minutes light skills drills as recovery

Useful Resources

Gambetta Vern (2007) Athletic Development, The Art and Science of Functional Sports Conditioning Human Kinetics Champaign Ill

Strudwick Tony (2016) (Editor) Soccer Science, Using Science to Develop Players and Teams Human Kinetics Champaign Ill

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Comments

  1. Brett Richmond says:

    Interesting

  2. James Marshall says:

    Thanks Simon.

  3. James Marshall says:

    I wouldn’t use Nordic curls though. We have found other exercises more suitable.

  4. Duncan Buckmaster says:

    Be interesting to know how the coach feels about the SSG’s use? I’m presuming they have met and discussed the needs for all players and this is the best fit

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